The Great Famine-Genocide in Soviet Ukraine (Holodomor)

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The Art of Ukrainians and Ukrainian Organizations Around the World Standing Up and Speaking Out Against Man-made Famine Whenever and Wherever it Occurs in the World Today!!

Who Will Stand Up and Speak Out? When? Why Do Ukrainians Around the World Remain Silent? ArtUkraine.com

STARVATION IN ZIMBABWE MALICIOUSLY ENGINEERED
  

"In more recent times whole nations had this tactic employed against them. Stalin's exportation of the whole Ukrainian harvest to Western Europe which resulted in seven million people dying in one winter was the most pitiful."

The people of Zimbabwe need South Africa, Sadc, the UN or anyone that can assist to step into the breach very soon. Or are they going to prevaricate and pontificate until it is "too late?"

 

Article By Ben Freeth, Former Commercial Farmers Union (CFU)
regional executive in Mashonaland West
OPINION
Zimbabwe Independent (Harare)
Distributed by All Africa Global Media (AllAfrica.com)
January 17, 2003 5:35pm

 

The post-election slogan of "chave chimurenga" (the war continues) is churned out ad nauseum.

President Robert Mugabe's statement at his party's conference in Chinhoyi was "our survival is an ongoing war".

The questions to be asked are:

    Who are the opponents?
    What does the war intend to achieve? and
    What is the modus operandi of the war?

On the first question, the opponents are anyone who is not actively part of the party. It is not good enough in the communist system to be apolitical. The party the world over works on the principle that if you are not for it, you are, necessarily, against it. Whether you like it or not, the party is at war with you if you do not actively support what it is trying to do.

The second question is answered simply. The war intends to achieve the destruction of all opposition by making the opposition an extension of itself.

The third question is the one I wish to dwell on. The modus operandi of the party is simply to starve all opposition into submission so that individuals become an active part of the party if they wish to get food. The precedent to this, starting in ancient times, is the classic siege of a fortified city or a fortress which, given time, was very effective.

In more recent times whole nations had this tactic employed against them. Stalin's exportation of the whole Ukrainian harvest to Western Europe which resulted in seven million people dying in one winter was the most pitiful.

For Zimbabwe though, hunger has been used very successfully far more recently. Plans were well laid with communist North Korean instructors arriving in Zimbabwe soon after Independence in 1981. The Fifth Brigade, a private army with different uniforms, different equipment, and different communication systems to other units, was made ready with, in Mugabe's words, "a political orientation". By 1983 the massacres known as Gukuruhundi started. Curfews were imposed, shops were shut, transportation was stopped and drought relief food was blocked.

In 1984 in Matabeleland South 15 000 troops and police laid siege to a population of approximately 400 000. At a meeting with local Ndebele people, a Fifth Brigade officer is reported to have said regarding the starvation policy: "First you will eat your chickens, then your goats, then your cattle, then your donkeys. Then you will eat your children..."

The Bishop of Bulawayo charged the government with employing a policy of "systematic starvation". Gukurahundi continued over a period of four years.

Thousands of civilians were either starved to death or were murdered. It was only at the end of 1987 that the late Joshua Nkomo finally capitulated and signed the "Unity Accord".

In Zimbabwe today the starvation that we see is only the start. The famine early warning system reports that our cereal gap is now 907 000 tonnes. The UN reports that our food crop plantings are less than 50% of normal.

The starvation we face in 2003/2004 is horrific.

Anyone wishing to control food supply needs to cover three areas: First, food production needs to be significantly reduced. This has been done already in Zimbabwe with plantings of food crops down more than 50%. It was simple to achieve. The big farms where at least 50% of the maize and over 90% of soya beans, sugar cane, beef, dairy, poultry, wheat and seed crops were produced were invaded and the farmers and their workers beaten, imprisoned, and in some cases murdered, and their crops commandeered. In excess of 75% of these commercial farmers have been driven off their land.

To reduce production amongst small-scale farmers, the most effective policy is to make seed and fertiliser difficult to procure. To this end the GMB bought nearly half the country's maize seed and the state controls the price of maize produced by the farmer. The costs of production are over $200 000 per tonne for an average commercial four-tonne per hectare crop, and the producer price is $28 000 per tonne.

This leaves the farmer with a net loss of $88 000 for each hectare that he puts in the ground. It has now become illegal to market maize except through the GMB. Any maize found on farm is regularly seized by the state. Any farmer therefore legally producing and marketing maize is going to do so at a major loss. Tillage units were promised to the "new" farmers but only a handful of tractors were allocated to each district.

The second area is that food retailers and distributors need to be controlled. The most effective way to do this is by making it illegal to sell food above a gazetted price. In Zimbabwe this has been done so that most basic commodities have to be sold on the black market at exorbitant prices.

Police road blocks have been set up to stop the movement of food into these markets and party militia have been stationed in many areas to stop farmers who are off their farms from bringing food to their workers where they are still there. War veterans, Green Bombers and the Youth Brigade now monitor not only GMB outlets but also deliveries of maize and maize meal in rural areas.

The third area is that importers of food need to be hampered, delayed and controlled. Individuals or companies wishing to bring food into Zimbabwe first need to get a licence to do so. This is very difficult to get.

If an individual does not have a licence he is only allowed to bring in 20kg of maize a month. This is not enough to feed his family, let alone anyone else.

That just leaves the aid agencies. Again, to import food, special licences are required. These in some cases take months to acquire.

There are special conditions set regarding the type of food allowed, ie no GM maize. Long tailbacks occur at customs with lorries loaded with this vital commodity taking days to clear. Distribution is another nightmare, with party youths seizing food and local authorities trying to control who gets what, based on political affiliation. Meanwhile the country begins to starve.

But with all this going on - some of the measures subtle, others downright obvious - it seems incredible that Zimbabwe's neighbouring states, and especially South Africa, continue to condone the war taking place against the Zimbabwean people. Those that naively blame the starvation on "misguided policy" or "drought" or even "incompetence" need to think again.

The starvation in Zimbabwe is maliciously engineered. The people are under siege just as those towns and fortresses were besieged in ancient time. The people of Zimbabwe need South Africa, Sadc, the UN or anyone that can assist to step into the breach very soon. Or are they going to prevaricate and pontificate until it is "too late?"


Zimbabwe Independent (Harare), AllAfrica.com, January 17, 2003
http://allafrica.com/stories/200301170787.html
For personal and academic use only.
 
 

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