The Great Famine-Genocide in Soviet Ukraine (Holodomor)

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FAMINE POSTER, DEMONSTRATION, OCTOBER 2,1983, WASHINGTON, D.C.
"UKRAINE Bread Basket of Europe 1933, 7 Million Starved by MOSCOW" 50th Anniversary of the Genocidal Famine in Soviet Ukraine Great Famine Memorial Week, Rally, March, Concert Poster Created by Artist Roxolana Luczakowsky Armstrong
  

 

(Click on image to enlarge it)

In the fall of 1983 a Great Famine Memorial Week was held in Washington D.C. to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the genocidal famine in Soviet Ukraine 1932-1933. On October 2, 1983 a huge rally at the Washington monument, a march, demonstration and a memorial concert at the Kennedy Center, were the culmination of a series of events held during the Great Famine Memorial Week in the nation's capital.

For the events of the Great Famine Memorial Week Ukrainian-American artist Roxolana Luczakowsky Armstrong was asked to create a special poster. Here is Roxolana's personal story about the poster she created for the events held in Washington, D.C. regarding the 50th anniversary of the genocidal famine in Soviet Ukraine 1932-1933, "DEMONSTRATION, October 2, 1983, Washington, D.C., UKRAINE Bread Basket of Europe 1933, 7 Million Starved by MOSCOW."

 

From: Roxolana Luczakowsky Armstrong
Front Royal, Virginia, August 9, 2003
To: Morgan Williams, Publisher and Editor
www.ArtUkraine.com  Information Service (ARTUIS)
Washington, D.C. and Kyiv, Ukraine

 

Morgan,

I did this design for the famine poster at the behest of TheWashington.Group (TWG). in 1983 when a big manifestation to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the great famine was being planned. There was a flurry of activities connected with this commemoration in the Ukrainian community and I attended a conference at a local church where a couple of survivors of the famine spoke. I was greatly moved and that's where the "inspiration" came. Later I continued with this subject and did a series of large watercolors - most are in private collections now.

 

As a child I grew up with a rememberance of this terrible event because my parents talked about it a lot. It seems that at the time news about the tragedy reached Western Ukraaine where my family was living, my mother was expecting her first child and she got so upset that she misscarried. I would have had an older sibling, so in this way, I could say that my life was indirectly affected by this horror.

 

When we came to this country (USA) and I became a student in higher education. I (and many of my generation) was shocked that nothing was known about the Ukrainian Famine - it was a "non event"! Thankfully that has now changed.

 

Some anecdotes about the poster itself. About 5,000 were printed for the demonstration where they were given out gratis. I kept 5 and through the years sent 2 to Ukraine via friends. I don't where they ended up. One Ukrainian newspaper published the poster last year (without acknowledging my authorship) along with a column by my very old friend Marta Bohachewsky- Chomiak - a true coincidence! An organization in Canada ("Media Watch Ukraine," I think) asked me to reprint several copies two years ago and they gave one to Dr. Mace.

 

One last curiosity: just before sending the poster to the printer, the committee decided on a change in the text which was super imposed on the drawing. Since I was out of country at the time, I gave them permission over the phone and they "surgically" altered the space. It is very hard to discen the change, but some art buff might be amused looking for tell-tale signs!

 

I hope this information is helpful,

Best Wishes, Roxolana Armstrong
Front Royal, Virginia, August 9, 2003


NOTE: To read the story of the events held in Washington, D.C.in October of 1983 related to the 50th anniversary of the Great Famine in Soviet Ukraine in 1932-1933 click on the following link to The Ukrainian Weekly:

http://www.ukrweekly.com/Archive/1983/418301.shtml


BIO INFO: ROXOLANA LUCZAKOWSKY ARMSTRONG
Website: http://www.agdei.com/roxolana.html

Roxolana Luczakowsky Armstrong was born in Stanislaviv, Ukraine, in 1938. Due to the political upheavals of World War II, Roxolana, along with her family, in 1950, settled in Philadelphia, Pa. From 1954 through 1957 Roxolana studied basic artistic techniques at the "Ukrainian Art Studio." In 1958, with a grant from the city council of Philadelphia, Roxolana went on to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and acquired her degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (Magna Cum Laude) under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania Fine Arts coordinated programs.

In 1964 Roxolana moved to Malaga, Spain, with her husband, the American sculptor, H. Reed Armstrong, where they proceeded with their professional careers while participating in Spanish artistic and social life. They helped found the nucleus of the Spanish "Friends of Unicef," assisted in the ecologically oriented "amigos del paisaje," and helped to originate the group "Siete Artistas" to bring out valid unrecognized talent in Southern Spain.

At this time Roxolana while working independently in the techniques of classic mosaic and stained glass stumbled through the use of transparent polymer resins on her own vision of a transparent, luminous three dimensional mosaic. These creations under the name of "Crystal Art" may be found in homes, churches, and public buildings, both in Europe and America.

Roxolana has continued through the years drawing and painting in oil, acrylic, and watercolor, exhibiting in group and individual shows on both sides of the Atlantic.

Group shows include: The Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; The Ukrainian Institute, New York; Gallery II, Princeton, N.J.; Arte Joven, Torremolinos; SalÑn de Invierno, Malaga; Circulo 2, Madrid; Contemporary Chistian Art, Philadelphia; Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Malaga; Certamen de Pintura, Santander.

Some individual shows include: The Ukrainian Institute, New York; Palacio de Congresos, Torremolinos; Galeria Provincia, Leon; Banco de Granada, Almußecar; Saint Sophia Institute, Washington, D.C.; Galeria Malakke, Malaga; Library of the Basilian Nuns, Fox Chase, Philadelphia.

Her work is found in the Marian Center of Studies, Cincinnati, Ohio; the John Paul II Center in Washington, D.C., and numerous private collections. Recently she completed a series of 24 historical illustrations for some upcoming "Lord of History" educational trading cards.

She lives in Front Royal, Va., with her husband, H. Reed Armstrong.


This historical material has been complied, edited and published by the  www.ArtUkraine.com  Information Service (ARTUIS). The material can be used but only with full credits to the  www.ArtUkraine.com  Information Service (ARTUIS), Kyiv, Ukraine and Washington, D.C., E. Morgan Williams, Publisher.
FOR PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC USE ONLY
 
 

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